Fantastic 1966 Porsche 912 Barn Find

The Porsche 912 came on the automotive scene in 1965 and served as a great sports car between the Porsche 356 and the young 911 buyers. Coming with a four-cylinder engine instead of the 911’s now famous and more popular flat-six. This made it cheaper to buy, more balanced, and more familiar to those who loved the 356. Initially, the 912 outsold the 911 by a large margin which was a big boost to Porsches bottom line.

Porsche offered the short lived 912 through 1969, at which point it was then replaced with the 914 model, before returning for one more year in 1976 as the 912E.

This 912 in particular was purchased from its original Tennessee owner and is in very restorable condition. The current owner reports that the gauges, radio and even wipers still work. The engine runs, but looks to need a complete tune up and probably a good general going over.

The interior is in good shape with no rips in the seats and a head liner that is still in place. By the way the car is a complete numbers matching car which any Porsche buyer will appreciate. About the only thing not original is someone decided to give the car a quick low quality spray of red paint, so unfortunately the original red paint is gone. Other than that this will be a great car for someone to get running well and restore.

Sure it may not be the popular 911 that we all know and love, but rest assured these 912’s will have their day in the collector world, so now is the time to snatch up these beauties while they are relatively affordable, then enjoy the eventual upswing in prices that will come.

The Importance Of Tightening Spokes On Wire Wheels On Classic Cars

I own a number of classic cars and have never really been a fan of wire wheels for a variety of reason. Firstly they take a lot of cleaning and it is very difficult to get between all the spokes and to clean the hub properly. Secondly and more importantly, spokes can work loose, or worse still they can actually crack or break under hard driving. I have never had a spoke snap on me, you really need to be doing some spirited rallying for them to fail, but I have had them work loose.

Over the years I have replaced the wire wheels on some of our cars (MGB Roadster, Triumph TR4a and Austin Healey) with Minilite alloy wheels and have D-Type alloy wheels on our Jaguar E-Type. These are easier to clean, no spokes to mess about with and they are actually easier for tyre companies to balance properly so normally make for a smoother, better ride. One of my latest acquisitions is a 1961 Jaguar Mk2 saloon which arrived with chrome wire wheels. Minilites would look out of place on a Jaguar and changing to standard steel wheels would involve replacing the hubs, and would look a bit plain and boring. So for now I am sticking with the wire wheels.

Cleaning the wheels recently, I noticed that a couple of the spokes were loose, and much credit to my local garage they also spotted this on the car’s annual MOT test, so I decided I needed to check all the spokes on all five wheels (including the spare).

This is a non-trivial task and can’t be done with the wheels on the car as you need to be able to get to both sides of the wheels to tighten the outer and inner spokes. First you need a spoke spanner, or at least a spanner the same size as the spoke nipples. The spokes themselves don’t tighten, they are held in place by the nipples and it is the nipples than need tightening. These are fitted though the steel wheel rim onto the spokes and the head of the nipple is therefore inside the wheel, touching the inflated inner tube. If you tighten the nipples with the tyre inflated it is quite likely they will pinch the tube and could puncture it.

The first thing to do is therefore to deflate the tyre almost fully. Then find the loose spoke(s) and tighten the nipple until the spoke no longer actually feels loose. Once the loose spoke(s) are tightened, you should then work round the whole wheel tightening up all the spoke nipples a little. Start at the valve and work round the outer spokes, and then turn the wheel over and work round the inner spokes. So you don’t overtighten any spokes, just tighten them a little and then work all the way round the wheel again giving them another little tweak.

Once all the spokes have been tightened you can re-inflate the wheel to the correct pressure, then refit to the car and move onto the next wheel. Completing all five wheels will probably take a couple of hours. Particularly if like me, you use the opportunity, of having the wheels off the car, to clean and polish them properly.

Jaguar E-Type Driving Experience Days

The Jaguar e-type is a special car that is held dear by many, to understand why all you need do is analyse the statistics of this car. This car known as the e-type in the United Kingdom was called the XK-E in the North American market.

These days it is a legendary car, and a perfect choice for a driving experience, be it for yourself or as a gift for someone else. To understand why the e-type is such a good choice we need to understand why it took control of the market the way it did and why it has remained a much loved car to this day.

Manufactured from 1961 till 1975 this car was known for its beautiful aesthetics and addictive performance. It had a book 0-60 of 7.1 seconds but this was a cautious number and in reality most of the cars where faster than this, some even claiming to complete the dash in as little as 6.7 seconds, now that’s still a fast car even compared to cars on the market today.

Powered by a great throbbing straight 6 that came in either 3.8 or 4.2 litre spec. It was designed to be lightweight, giving much crisper handling and improved acceleration over its rivals of the time. It was also very competitively priced. If you can make your car more beautiful, faster and more nimble than your rivals you are already onto to a winner, Jaguar also made the car cheaper than its rivals, this ensured high sales figures.

It wasn’t just the beauty or the straight line speed that people fell in love with, it came in a very capable package that would handle like very few cars of the time, with a modern suspension and brake setup based on the earlier Le Mans 24hr winning car.

The e-type is a rare car these days, buying one in good conditions isn’t easy to achieve and if you manage to find one, its price tag will put it out of reach of most. Which is a shame for a car that was described by Enzo Ferrari as the most beautiful car ever made when it was released and Enzo knew a lot about cars.

If you can’t buy one of these (and if you did you would have to deal with the maintenance costs associated with an old classic British sports car) but still want to experience the drive of one, then you could attend a Jaguar e-type driving experience, you will have a tutorial and a chat with the instructor about the history of this fantastic car before getting your chance to take control of the wheel and push it as hard as you dare around a race track, this is the way this car was designed to be enjoyed, it was based on a Le Mans winning race car after all.